Discussion:
Some write-ups on poet Carson McCullers
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Will Dockery
2017-03-04 19:46:31 UTC
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A great collection of write ups on Carson McCullers...

http://www.topix.com/forum/city/columbus-ga/TL83BK2DJBDMB0FEP

“The most fatal thing a man can do is try to stand alone.”
March 4, 2017 8:01 AM Subscribe
Carson McCullers at 100: A Century of American Suffering [The Guardian]
“Where truth fails, fiction flourishes. In The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter,
Carson McCullers, who would have turned 100 years old on Sunday, distilled
all of these consternations, enabling in literature the self-reckoning that
had been avoided in reality. Set in a southern mill town much like her own
Columbus, Georgia, The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter [wiki] traces the hapless
lives of five townspeople, all of whom are inexplicably drawn to a deaf-mute
named John Singer. There is the young Mick Kelly, a teenage girl who dreams
of making it big; Biff Bannon, the middle-class owner of a local cafe; Jake
Blount, the most overtly political character and Dr Benedict Copeland, the
town’s African American doctor who rails against the inequities of a racist
society, but is helpless against them. As they all interact with Singer,
they fail to notice his pain or that he is mourning a loss of his own: the
banishment of his friend Spiros Antonapoulos to an insane asylum.”

• Carson McCullers at 100 [The New York Times]
“ Her debut, “The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter,” is routinely listed among the
best books of the 20th century, and Rose Feld’s assessment of it in the Book
Review in 1940 proves that its towering reputation was formed more or less
immediately. “No matter what the age of its author, ‘The Heart Is a Lonely
Hunter’ would be a remarkable book,” Feld started. “When one reads that
Carson McCullers is a girl of 22 it becomes more than that. Maturity does
not cover the quality of her work. It is something beyond that, something
more akin to the vocation of pain to which a great poet is born.” McCullers
was actually 23 at the time, but point taken.”

• White Writer [The New Yorker]
“But what of the white writer who wishes to be artistically engaged but who
simultaneously does not want to re-create cultural dominance in her work?
Are there complex, nuanced representations by other white people which we
might turn toward? I suggest that one answer may lie in the unlikely legacy
of a pale, sickly writer from the mid-twentieth century, who smoked and
drank herself to death by the age of fifty, and whose own personal turmoil
and self-destruction may be at the root of the enormous insights about
difference found throughout her work. In 1940, a white twenty-three-year-old
woman, slight and awkwardly charming, from segregated Georgia, published an
extraordinary novel, “The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter.” ”

• Carson McCullers: the Aesthetic of Pain [Virginia Quarterly Review]
“The Heart is a Lonely Hunter was and is a remarkable book—that a
23-year-old woman could write with so much mastery and so much perception
about so diverse a range of characters was odd indeed. The talent that was
able to observe the variety of experience that went into those
characterizations was something close to genius. The capacity for
observation, for perceiving and detailing the concerns of the various
people, was stunning in its virtuosity. What I find most remarkable, reading
the novel over again and in light of those that followed and also from what
I have learned from Mrs. Carr’s biography, is that a writer whose
imagination is so subjective, whose art is so suffused with emotional
coloration and is based upon the capacity to convey the endless sameness of
human suffering, could at the same time see and record and catalogue so
much, with such clear specificity and concrete objectivity of detail”

Since I'll never pass up a chance to promote Suzanne Vega, she recently put
out an album dedicated to McCullers.
posted by downtohisturtles at 8:32 AM on March 4

There were several more but space considerations required an edit...
&
2017-03-04 20:23:33 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Will Dockery
A great collection of write ups on Carson McCullers...
http://www.topix.com/forum/city/columbus-ga/TL83BK2DJBDMB0FEP
“The most fatal thing a man can do is try to stand alone.” March 4,
2017 8:01 AM Subscribe Carson McCullers at 100: A Century of
American Suffering [The Guardian] “Where truth fails, fiction
flourishes. In The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter, Carson McCullers, who
would have turned 100 years old on Sunday, distilled all of these
consternations, enabling in literature the self-reckoning that had
been avoided in reality. Set in a southern mill town much like her
own Columbus, Georgia, The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter [wiki] traces the
hapless lives of five townspeople, all of whom are inexplicably drawn
to a deaf-mute named John Singer. There is the young Mick Kelly, a
teenage girl who dreams of making it big; Biff Bannon, the
middle-class owner of a local cafe; Jake Blount, the most overtly
political character and Dr Benedict Copeland, the town’s African
American doctor who rails against the inequities of a racist
society, but is helpless against them. As they all interact with
Singer, they fail to notice his pain or that he is mourning a loss of
his own: the banishment of his friend Spiros Antonapoulos to an
insane asylum.”
• Carson McCullers at 100 [The New York Times] “ Her debut, “The
Heart Is a Lonely Hunter,” is routinely listed among the best books
of the 20th century, and Rose Feld’s assessment of it in the Book
Review in 1940 proves that its towering reputation was formed more or
less immediately. “No matter what the age of its author, ‘The Heart
Is a Lonely Hunter’ would be a remarkable book,” Feld started. “When
one reads that Carson McCullers is a girl of 22 it becomes more than
that. Maturity does not cover the quality of her work. It is
something beyond that, something more akin to the vocation of pain
to which a great poet is born.” McCullers was actually 23 at the
time, but point taken.”
• White Writer [The New Yorker] “But what of the white writer who
wishes to be artistically engaged but who simultaneously does not
want to re-create cultural dominance in her work? Are there complex,
nuanced representations by other white people which we might turn
toward? I suggest that one answer may lie in the unlikely legacy of a
pale, sickly writer from the mid-twentieth century, who smoked and
drank herself to death by the age of fifty, and whose own personal
turmoil and self-destruction may be at the root of the enormous
insights about difference found throughout her work. In 1940, a
white twenty-three-year-old woman, slight and awkwardly charming,
from segregated Georgia, published an extraordinary novel, “The Heart
Is a Lonely Hunter.” ”
• Carson McCullers: the Aesthetic of Pain [Virginia Quarterly
Review] “The Heart is a Lonely Hunter was and is a remarkable
book—that a 23-year-old woman could write with so much mastery and so
much perception about so diverse a range of characters was odd
indeed. The talent that was able to observe the variety of experience
that went into those characterizations was something close to genius.
The capacity for observation, for perceiving and detailing the
concerns of the various people, was stunning in its virtuosity. What
I find most remarkable, reading the novel over again and in light of
those that followed and also from what I have learned from Mrs.
Carr’s biography, is that a writer whose imagination is so
subjective, whose art is so suffused with emotional coloration and is
based upon the capacity to convey the endless sameness of human
suffering, could at the same time see and record and catalogue so
much, with such clear specificity and concrete objectivity of
detail”
Since I'll never pass up a chance to promote Suzanne Vega, she
recently put out an album dedicated to McCullers. posted by
downtohisturtles at 8:32 AM on March 4
suzanne vega is a whore
Post by Will Dockery
There were several more but space considerations required an edit...
Will Dockery
2017-03-18 06:31:52 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Will Dockery
A great collection of write ups on Carson McCullers...
http://www.topix.com/forum/city/columbus-ga/TL83BK2DJBDMB0FEP
“The most fatal thing a man can do is try to stand alone.” March 4,
2017 8:01 AM Subscribe Carson McCullers at 100: A Century of
American Suffering [The Guardian] “Where truth fails, fiction
flourishes. In The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter, Carson McCullers, who
would have turned 100 years old on Sunday, distilled all of these
consternations, enabling in literature the self-reckoning that had
been avoided in reality. Set in a southern mill town much like her
own Columbus, Georgia, The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter [wiki] traces the
hapless lives of five townspeople, all of whom are inexplicably drawn
to a deaf-mute named John Singer. There is the young Mick Kelly, a
teenage girl who dreams of making it big; Biff Bannon, the
middle-class owner of a local cafe; Jake Blount, the most overtly
political character and Dr Benedict Copeland, the town’s African
American doctor who rails against the inequities of a racist
society, but is helpless against them. As they all interact with
Singer, they fail to notice his pain or that he is mourning a loss of
his own: the banishment of his friend Spiros Antonapoulos to an
insane asylum.”
• Carson McCullers at 100 [The New York Times] “ Her debut, “The
Heart Is a Lonely Hunter,” is routinely listed among the best books
of the 20th century, and Rose Feld’s assessment of it in the Book
Review in 1940 proves that its towering reputation was formed more or
less immediately. “No matter what the age of its author, ‘The Heart
Is a Lonely Hunter’ would be a remarkable book,” Feld started. “When
one reads that Carson McCullers is a girl of 22 it becomes more than
that. Maturity does not cover the quality of her work. It is
something beyond that, something more akin to the vocation of pain
to which a great poet is born.” McCullers was actually 23 at the
time, but point taken.”
• White Writer [The New Yorker] “But what of the white writer who
wishes to be artistically engaged but who simultaneously does not
want to re-create cultural dominance in her work? Are there complex,
nuanced representations by other white people which we might turn
toward? I suggest that one answer may lie in the unlikely legacy of a
pale, sickly writer from the mid-twentieth century, who smoked and
drank herself to death by the age of fifty, and whose own personal
turmoil and self-destruction may be at the root of the enormous
insights about difference found throughout her work. In 1940, a
white twenty-three-year-old woman, slight and awkwardly charming,
from segregated Georgia, published an extraordinary novel, “The Heart
Is a Lonely Hunter.” ”
• Carson McCullers: the Aesthetic of Pain [Virginia Quarterly
Review] “The Heart is a Lonely Hunter was and is a remarkable
book—that a 23-year-old woman could write with so much mastery and so
much perception about so diverse a range of characters was odd
indeed. The talent that was able to observe the variety of experience
that went into those characterizations was something close to genius.
The capacity for observation, for perceiving and detailing the
concerns of the various people, was stunning in its virtuosity. What
I find most remarkable, reading the novel over again and in light of
those that followed and also from what I have learned from Mrs.
Carr’s biography, is that a writer whose imagination is so
subjective, whose art is so suffused with emotional coloration and is
based upon the capacity to convey the endless sameness of human
suffering, could at the same time see and record and catalogue so
much, with such clear specificity and concrete objectivity of
detail”
Since I'll never pass up a chance to promote Suzanne Vega, she
recently put out an album dedicated to McCullers. posted by
downtohisturtles at 8:32 AM on March 4
suzanne vega is

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No doubt!

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