Discussion:
The Original Dream Tears / Will Dockery
(too old to reply)
Will Dockery
2016-04-22 19:19:43 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
The Original Dream Tears
Spanish guitar flutters.
It was 1895 or so
I was in a dream.
I met my bride on Saint George Street
sweet brown nameless bride.
In the big clapboard city market house
train station dream place.
Her eyes and smile
her sparkle of wit, my dream wife.
We sit with happy conversation.
Across the huge room
I see the drunken unreconstructed rebel.
Swearing and pushing people.
I nod to her
that it's time for us to slide.
We cut through the side room bar area
crowded---
I look back
my heart sinks
She is not behind me.
I don't see her anywhere
among these happy ghosts.
I step out on this street
waiting
looking
no sign of her.
I step back in.
Coming through the opposite
far entrance I see...
The parade of proud Klansmen.
It all becomes clear to me
they took her.
My sweet smiling nameless bride.
I step back onto Saint George street
salt breeze and fish smell in the air.
I sit with a group of fellow ghosts
beaten and grey under an awning
and I cry --- floods and torrents of tears.
Spanish guitar flutters.
-Will Dockery
Reading this as a dream, the ego (conscious reason) falls in love with the
anima; but subconscious forces (shadow/id) appear to destroy the union --
reclaiming the anima, and leaving the ego diminished by its awareness of its
isolation from integrated selfhood.

In keeping with the speaker's opening statement of "I was in a dream," the
ego remains entirely under the domination of the subconscious throughout.
The anima is recognized as the ego's counterpart (bride), as a psychological
archetype (nameless), but is perceived by the ego as "dark" (from the
subconscious, forbidden, mysterious, and possibly dangerous).

The anima's darkness is a key factor in the ensuing narrative, with the
subconscious forces taking on the identity of Klansmen (both KKK and dark
kin to the subconscious anima). In other words, the speaker's own conscious
prejudices cause him to subconsciously reject (rebel against) the
integration of subconscious factors into the ego (as well as the interracial
romance which serves as a projection of it).

The "fellow ghosts" imply that this is the latest in a long line of
unsuccessful attempts at psychological integration with the ghosts being
memories of other failures (most likely encountered as other projected
romances).

The final line implies that the sadness/realization of the dream/failed
integration serves as the inspiration for the speaker's art (in this case,
music). When taken in conjunction with the duplicate opening line, the
entire process can be viewed as cyclical.

All in all, a perfect rendering of artistic inspiration: romancing the muse.

===============================================

Thanks again for a stellar review, Pendragon... I'd like to quote this one,
if you don't mind.

:)
Will Dockery
2016-11-26 19:27:47 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
The Original Dream Tears
Spanish guitar flutters.
It was 1895 or so
I was in a dream.
I met my bride on Saint George Street
sweet brown nameless bride.
In the big clapboard city market house
train station dream place.
Her eyes and smile
her sparkle of wit, my dream wife.
We sit with happy conversation.
Across the huge room
I see the drunken unreconstructed rebel.
Swearing and pushing people.
I nod to her
that it's time for us to slide.
We cut through the side room bar area
crowded---
I look back
my heart sinks
She is not behind me.
I don't see her anywhere
among these happy ghosts.
I step out on this street
waiting
looking
no sign of her.
I step back in.
Coming through the opposite
far entrance I see...
The parade of proud Klansmen.
It all becomes clear to me
they took her.
My sweet smiling nameless bride.
I step back onto Saint George street
salt breeze and fish smell in the air.
I sit with a group of fellow ghosts
beaten and grey under an awning
and I cry --- floods and torrents of tears.
Spanish guitar flutters.
-Will Dockery
Reading this as a dream, the ego (conscious reason) falls in love with the
anima; but subconscious forces (shadow/id) appear to destroy the union --
reclaiming the anima, and leaving the ego diminished by its awareness of its
isolation from integrated selfhood.

In keeping with the speaker's opening statement of "I was in a dream," the
ego remains entirely under the domination of the subconscious throughout.
The anima is recognized as the ego's counterpart (bride), as a psychological
archetype (nameless), but is perceived by the ego as "dark" (from the
subconscious, forbidden, mysterious, and possibly dangerous).

The anima's darkness is a key factor in the ensuing narrative, with the
subconscious forces taking on the identity of Klansmen (both KKK and dark
kin to the subconscious anima). In other words, the speaker's own conscious
prejudices cause him to subconsciously reject (rebel against) the
integration of subconscious factors into the ego (as well as the interracial
romance which serves as a projection of it).

The "fellow ghosts" imply that this is the latest in a long line of
unsuccessful attempts at psychological integration with the ghosts being
memories of other failures (most likely encountered as other projected
romances).

The final line implies that the sadness/realization of the dream/failed
integration serves as the inspiration for the speaker's art (in this case,
music). When taken in conjunction with the duplicate opening line, the
entire process can be viewed as cyclical.

All in all, a perfect rendering of artistic inspiration: romancing the muse.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Another splendid critique, thanks again, Michael

Loading...