Discussion:
Ashes To Justice / Will Dockery & Sandy Madaris
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Will Dockery
2015-04-05 17:47:31 UTC
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Well, a great mystery solved, and just in time for the Holidays!
Speaking of which (Easter/Passover) my selection for "poet of the day",
Harry Kemp, declared Jesus Christ the "divine hobo" and the "Super Tramp"
about 100 years ago. And of course the 1970s art rockers Supertramp named
themselves in both Christ and Kemp's honor.
As a preview of Harry Kemp, you can read some of his poetry over at
Tramping on Life by Harry Kemp
http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/15415
"Harry Kemp (December 15, 1883 - August 5, 1960) was an American poet and
prose writer of the twentieth century. He was known as (and promoted
himself
as) the "Vagabond Poet", the "Villon of America", the "Hobo Poet", or the
"Tramp Poet", and was a well-known popular literary figure of his era..."
Well, that kept me busy this morning. I went over to PPP, and found you'd
already added an article on Kemp; so I spent a while adding pictures, poem
and book links, and a bibliography. While doing the last, I ran into a
collaboration on a non-fiction book, published only in England, with poet
Laura
Riding. That turned out to be by another, English, poet named Harry Kemp,
so I next had to write an article on him.
I made a few small changes in the American Kemp's article, BTW. All the
modern books they thought were re-issues were by the British Kemp, so I
took them out. I also cut out the Supertramp reference; while it may have
come from Kemp's description of Jesus as the "supertramp", I think it's
most > likely it refers to W.H. Davies' /Autobiography of a Supertramp/.
The whole thing took hours, but it's worth it if it improves the wiki.
I'm glad you discovered this guy. I've been planning to use "Two Tramps in
Mud Time" as this month's Frost poem; I was looking for a Carman or
Hovey poem on spring vagabonding to go with it, but I think I'll look
through Kemp's books instead. Having those available is a happy
coincidence.
Another interesting co-incidence: I see that Kemp's book /The Passing
God/, which was also published in London, had an introduction by Richard
Le
Gallienne, whose "Easter Song" is the featured poem on The Penny Blog
today.
So... there are /two/ poets named Harry Kemp, that sure is a bit of an
amazing coincidence, and of course confusing to historians, glad you caught
that.

I found the American Harry Kemp, and a gang of other turn-of-the 20th
Century poets a few days ago when I found the fantastic book titled "Strange
Bedfellows" by Steven Watson at alocal Goodwill Thrift Store for 27 cents
(normally a $20 oversized paperback) and it will be my main text for this
month, National Poetry Month, as it is filled with poets from "the first
American Avant-Garde", and as such is filled with poets from New York to
Paris.

Poets of Revolt aka Free-Versers / Strange Bedfellows:
https://groups.google.com/d/msg/alt.arts.poetry.comments/OJNpPgmoBEg/jDJHfuXBJmMJ

Essays, biographies, charts, maps of New York from a hundred years ago and
earlier... like the Gangs of New York only poetry, art and music.

Great stuff, needless to say.

A detailed run-down on the poetry scene of that era, lots of regulars and
factions... here's quick run-down on those...
Nice section in the book Strange Bedfellows (And "The History of Modern
Poetry", Page 311 by David Perkins, which is where Steven Watson seems to
have gotten most of his information) about the movement that took off around
1910 (and not before in any major way, although the form can be traced back
as far as Beowulf, the writer claims) the "Poets of Revolt" aka "Free
Versers".

Ezra Pound and Amy Lowell seem to me to be the most famous poets of this
group. In 1912, Pound wrote "I believe in /Absolute Rhythm/, that is [...]
poetry that corresponds exactly to the emotion being expressed..."

The Poets of Revolt term was supposedly generic for the new poets, the
writers of the 1910s also known as "free-versers" and vers librists, because
they championed the rise of free verse, which replaced fixed stanzas, meter
and rhyme with Absolute Rhythm, as Erza Pound called it.

In addition, there were other distinctive factions during 1910-1917 and
beyond...

The Tramp Poets (!) aka Hobohemians, led by Vachel Lindsay, Harry Kemp and
others, The Patagonians, Imagists and the Otherists all fit under the
generic (and sometimes sneering) label of Poets of Revolt, the Free-Versers.

Poets loosely associated with these groups included:

Richard Aldington
Amy Lowell
Vachel Lindsay
Harry Kemp
Donald Evans
Allen Norton
Louise Norton
H.D.
Mina Loy
William Carlos Williams
Alfred Kreymborg
Ezra Pound

In the Saturday Evening Post of April 7th 1917 Sinclair Lewis wrote:

"It is called /free verse/ because it doesn't pay."

And this was just from opening the book at random, there seems to be lots
more, and quite a few more lost poets that are deserving the spotlight.
--
Poet of the Day (4-5-2015) - Harry Kemp (American poet)
http://pennyspoetry.wikia.com/wiki/Harry_Kemp
Will Dockery
2016-11-24 08:13:31 UTC
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"George Dance" wrote in message news:f78a92d5-cb09-46bc-be76-***@googlegroups.com...

I'll have to archive this post, as it's the source of the following snipku:

The truth
has almost reduced
to silence
- Will Dockery & George J. Dance

Needs a separate thread as well...
Will Dockery
2016-11-25 22:14:44 UTC
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Here's video of Sandy Madaris and I performing live, which turned out to be
a rare bit of footage...

I saw Joe Cocker here at the Municiple Auditorium back in 1975. He was very
loose but brilliant.

Joe Cocker tribute by Will Dockery, Sandy Madaris & The Conley Brothers

http://www.reverbnation.com/open_graph/video/4971478

And so it goes.
Will Dockery
2016-11-29 15:11:23 UTC
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maybe not ykw will like this. :)?
I wish "you know who" would record an album of MY songs next time rather
than more Frank Sinatra.

:)
Will Dockery
2016-11-29 16:05:57 UTC
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Speaking of which (Easter/Passover) my selection for "poet of the
day",
Harry Kemp, declared Jesus Christ the "divine hobo" and the "Super
Tramp"
about 100 years ago. And of course the 1970s art rockers Supertramp
named
themselves in both Christ and Kemp's honor.
As a preview of Harry Kemp, you can read some of his poetry over at
Tramping on Life by Harry Kemp
http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/15415
"Harry Kemp (December 15, 1883 - August 5, 1960) was an American poet
and
prose writer of the twentieth century. He was known as (and promoted
himself
as) the "Vagabond Poet", the "Villon of America", the "Hobo Poet", or
the
"Tramp Poet", and was a well-known popular literary figure of his
era..."
:)
Maybe if Jesus were alive today, he would be compared to and called the
SuperTrump!
(okay, that was dumb)
I think Jesus would lean more to Bernie Sanders in this election.
:)
It was a play on Trump. He would be the Trump card for the Left, the poor
and the down-trodden, the huddled masses...under their picnic blankets... ho
ho ho.

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Sadly enough, few folks are laughing very much at Trump these days.
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